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The Winged Liberty "Mercury" Dime

You will find more detailed buying and selling information on the Mercury Dime and 11 other popular U.S. silver coins in my eBook The Last US 90 Percent Silver Coins.

Don't let the Mercury Dime's size fool you. In 1980, this silver coin could buy a gallon of gas. It wasn't because gas was so cheap. It was because silver was at an all-time high, reaching $50.00 per ounce. Some say it is headed that high again. Read on... 

The Mercury Dime - A Brief History

The Mercury Dime is "officially" known as the Winged Liberty Head Dime. The wings crowning Liberty's cap are meant to symbolize liberty of thought. Designed by Adolph A. Weinman, this popular coin was minted from 1916 through 1945.

A total of three U. S. Mints were involved in the production of Mercury Dimes: Denver; Philadelphia; and, San Francisco. As with any silver (and gold) coins, some are more valuable than others due in part to low mintage/scarcity (as well as condition and demand). Here are the...

Five Lowest Minted Mercury Dimes**

1916D - 264,000; 1921D - 1,080,000; 1921 - 1,230,000;
1931D - 1,260,000; 1926S - 1,520,000.
 

** Circulated coins in even fair condition may fetch a premium price over spot silver due to the low mintage (and therefore rarity) of these coins. The 1916D is especially valuable. A circulated 1916D in just fair condition may be worth several hundred dollars.

The Mercury Dime - More Details

The Mercury Dime features an image of a Winged Liberty The Mercury Dime - silver bullion coinHead on the obverse side with a fasces and olive branch on the reverse (fasces: a bundle of white birch rods bound together around an ax with the blade projecting, carried before ancient Roman magistrates as an emblem of authority). The mint mark appears on the reverse, to the left of the fasces. Mint marks are "D" for Denver and "S" for the San Francisco Mints. If no mint mark appears, it was minted in Philadelphia.

Reverse view of Silver Mercury DimeMercury Dimes are 90% silver and 10% copper. Uncirculated coins contain .0723 Troy ounces of pure silver (2.25 grams) with a gross weight of .08 Troy ounces (2.50 grams). Circulated Mercury Dimes are considered to contain .0715 Troy ounces of pure silver (2.2239 grams) due to the "wear factor" in handling these coins. Circulated silver coins are sometimes referred to as "junk silver" but don't believe it.



To determine the silver (melt) value of a circulated Mercury Dime, multiply the current spot price of silver times .0715.

Example: $20.00 x .0715 = $1.43


Mercury Dimes on eBay

A good place to buy Mercury Dimes is at your local coin shop, but don't overlook eBay auctions. Here you will find circulated coins sold in quantities of one, in small lots or even entire collections. If you bid on one or more auctions, keep in mind that approximately 14 dimes equal one ounce of silver and use that as a guide when bidding on circulated coins. Of course, auctions for uncirculated Mercury Dimes (MS60 and higher) will fetch a higher price.



Disclaimer: I have made every reasonable effort to produce an informative and helpful article on Mercury Dimes based on my research and experiences. However, I make no representation or warranties of any kind with regard to its completeness, accuracy or suitability for any specific situation or purpose. See Terms and Conditions for more info.


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